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Michael Sandel: THE MORAL SIDE OF MURDER
54 minutes
MY LIST
PART ONE: THE MORAL SIDE OF MURDER <br>If you had to choose between (1) killing one person to save the lives of five others and (2) doing nothing even though you knew that five people would die right before your eyes if you did nothing—what would you do? What would be the right thing to do? Thats the hypothetical scenario Professor Michael Sandel uses to launch his course on moral reasoning. After the majority of students votes for killing the one person in order to save the lives of five others, Sandel presents three similar moral conundrums—each one artfully designed to make the decision more difficult. As students stand up to defend their conflicting choices, it becomes clear that the assumptions behind our moral reasoning are often contradictory, and the question of what is right and what is wrong is not always black and white. <br>PART TWO: THE CASE FOR CANNIBALISM <br>Sandel introduces the principles of utilitarian philosopher, Jeremy Bentham, with a famous nineteenth century legal case involving a shipwrecked crew of four. After nineteen days lost at sea, the captain decides to kill the weakest amongst them, the young cabin boy, so that the rest can feed on his blood and body to survive. The case sets up a classroom debate about the moral validity of utilitarianism—and its doctrine that the right thing to do is whatever produces "the greatest good for the greatest number."
Simon Sinek: On Why Leaders Eat Last
45 minutes
MY LIST
In this in-depth talk, ethnographer and leadership expert Simon Sinek reveals the hidden dynamics that inspire leadership and trust. In biological terms, leaders get the first pick of food and other spoils, but at a cost. When danger is present, the group expects the leader to mitigate all threats even at the expense of their personal well-being. Understanding this deep-seated expectation is the key difference between someone who is just an "authority" versus a true leader.
Neil Turok: On The Astonishing Simplicity of Everything
83 minutes
MY LIST
In October 2015 Neil Turok, director of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics (PI) located in Waterloo, Canada opened the new season of the PI Public Lecture Series with a talk about the remarkable simplicity that underlies nature. Professor Turok, who was born in South Africa and now lives in Canada, discussed how this simplicity at the largest and tiniest scales of the Universe is pointing toward new avenues of research and revolutionary advances in technology.
Jordan Peterson: On His Battle with SJW at Joe Rogan Experience #958
177 minutes
MY LIST
Support Dr. Peterson's work at www.patreon.com/jordanbpeterson<br><br>0:30 - denied a grant to research political correctness?<br>3:30 - hammer & sickle vs nazi symbol<br>8:00 - allies and social points<br>13:15 - the gender unicorn <br>17:20 - those who claim to be legitimate representatives of a community vs heterogeneous views within<br>23:00 - post-modern neo Marxist using trans issues as a lever to push political nonsense<br>27:45 - Zer <br>30:45 - post-modernists opposed to having dialogues<br>41:00 - we are in a war of ideas<br>46:45 - teach people evil to help them understand themselves<br>48:00 - university's monitoring, intervention, and threat of student's private utterances on social media<br>50:20 - mansplaining<br>53:00 - best personality predictor of political correctness is the agreeableness trait<br>54:00 - causes for violence by the left<br>57:00 - the dominance hierarchy, Hitler<br>1:10:00 - good vs evil<br>1:13:30 - fight or flight or freeze<br>1:18:00 - bargaining with the future<br>1:23:30 - men were competing for influence, corruption leadership to attract women; hero<br>1:28:30 - men competing as allies to beat the hierarchy<br>1:31:00 - kek the frog; period of chaos<br>1:35:00 - tell the truth to deal with chaos in the underworld<br>1:41:30 - clean up your room before you try and change the outside<br>1:48:00 - morality comes when you are a monster and you can control it<br>1:58:00 - order, corruption, chaos<br>2:04:30 - 90% of my viewers and men<br>2:09:00 - accept your mortality<br>2:14:00 - future authoring and finding a purpose<br>2:17:00 - you cant trust yourself if you lie<br>2:28:00 - the biggest employment category (driver) is disappearing; the future is uncertain<br>2:31:30 - trump - unstructured problem with truth vs Hillary - structured problem with untruth<br>2:33:00 - you are in the top 1% too<br>2:37:00 - creative people is a double-edged blessing; you stand out - you die<br>2:41:30 - Canada suppresses excellence while USA celebrates it<br>2:43:20 - hierarchies are no always based on power but on competence<br>2:47:30 - why the university backed off from Peterson
Robert Sapolsky: Behavioral Evolution I
96 minutes
MY LIST
Stanford professor Robert Sapolsky lectures on the biology of behavioral evolution and thoroughly discusses examples such as The Prisoner's Dilemma.
Seth Godin: On Risk-Taking and Building a Tribe at Inbound Conference
47 minutes
MY LIST
Seth is a prolific author and master of branding. In this discussion he talks about risk-taking, deferring pleasure and how to build your tribe.
Oliver Sacks: On Hallucinations
74 minutes
MY LIST
Famed neurologist Oliver Sacks joined award-winning journalist John Hockenberry to discuss Sacks' latest book, which explores the bewitching and surreal world of hallucinations. The conversation canvassed the rich cultural history and contemporary science of the hallucinatory experience, and also touched on Sacks’ own early psychedelic forays that helped convince him to dedicate his life to neurology and to write about the myriad riddles of the human mind.
Malcolm Gladwell: Why Do Planes Crash?: On Outliers, Work, Culture, Communication (2008)
67 minutes
MY LIST
In Outliers, Gladwell examines the factors that contribute to high levels of success. This is an older talk from him that explores examples of outlier behaviour in different areas of life, how they are developed and their effect on the group.
Scott Galloway: On The Four Tech Giants: What To Do
48 minutes
MY LIST
Worth more than $2.3 trillion combined, the Big Four (Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google) continue to grab share from media companies, brands, and retailers. Scott Galloway, Professor of Marketing at the NYU Stern School of Business and Founder of L2, will showcase how the traditional rules of business don’t apply to the Big Four and identify ways that brands and companies can fight back.
Robert Cialdini: On Influence
18 minutes
MY LIST
In this talk Cialdini talks through psychological tools of influence. He is a master of persuasive techniques and gives specific examples of applications of these tools.
Elon Musk: On The Big Picture About The Future
59 minutes
MY LIST
Elon Musk talks about cars, space, energy, risks of A.I. and gets a standing ovation at the National Governors Association Summer Meeting. July 2017.
72 minutes
MY LIST
Twenty-first century depictions of love and marriage are shaped by a set of Romantic myths and misconceptions and with his trademark warmth and wit, Alain de Botton explores the complex landscape of a modern relationship, presenting a realistic case study for marriage and examining what it might mean to love, to be loved - and to stay in love. Alain de Botton is an internationally renowned philosopher, television presenter and author of international best sellers Essays in Love, How Proust Can Change Your Life and Status Anxiety. In this talk, he discusses his stunning new novel The Course of Love, a philosophical novel about modern relationships.
Robert Greene: On The 48 Laws of Power
28 minutes
MY LIST
Host Barry Kibrick sits down with Robet Greene, author of the world famous "48 Laws of Power", to talk about what it really means to have power and be powerful in a true sense.
Jocko Willink: On Military Experiences and Motivation at Joe Rogan Experience #962
172 minutes
MY LIST
Jocko Willink is a decorated retired Navy SEAL officer, author of the book Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win, and co-founder of Echelon Front, where he is a leadership instructor, speaker, and executive coach. This is an extended discussion with Joe Rogan that serves as a great introduction to Jocko's background and M.O.
Alan Watts: On Not Being Afraid To Screw Up
61 minutes
MY LIST
In this talk Alan Watts speaks about the roles of social institutions and role playing in our lives. He describes how our environment shifts the way we view ourselves, the roles we play in society and how emotions like fear and pain play a large part in determining our path.
Wim Hof: Demonstrating His Breathing Technique with Lewis Howes
20 minutes
MY LIST
The breathing exercise has a profound effect and should be practiced in the way it is explained. Always do the breathing exercise in a safe environment (e.g. sitting on a couch/floor) and unforced. <br> Never practice the exercises before or during diving, driving, swimming, taking a bath or in any other environment/place where, should you pass out, a serious injury could occur. Wim Hof breathing may cause tingling sensations and/or lightheadedness. If you’ve fainted, it means that you went to far. Take a step back next time. <br> The cold is a powerful force. We strongly advise to gradually build up exposing yourself to the cold. Always train without force and listen to your body carefully. If it is not practiced responsible, there is a risk of hypothermia. <br> Do not practice the method during pregnancy or when having epilepsy. Persons with cardiovascular health issues, or any other (serious) health conditions, should always consult a medical doctor before starting with the Wim Hof Method.
Rhonda Patrick: On sulphoraphane, antidepressants, heat/cold exposure and more at Joe Rogan Experience #901
176 minutes
MY LIST
Rhonda discusses sulphoraphane, antidepressants, effects of heat/cold exposure and much more in this extended discussion with Joe.
Steven Pinker: On Linguistics, Style and Writing in the 21st Century
53 minutes
MY LIST
In this talk, introduced by Lord Melvyn Bragg, Steven argues that style still matters: in communicating effectively, in enhancing the spread of ideas, in earning a reader’s trust and, not least, in adding beauty to the world. Steven Pinker is an experimental psychologist and one of the world’s foremost writers on language, mind, and human nature. He is Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University and conducts research on language and cognition but also writes for publications such as the New York Times, Time, and is the author of many books, including The Language Instinct and How the Mind Works.
Leonard Shlain: On Art & Physics: Parallel Visions in Space, Time & Light
54 minutes
MY LIST
Leonard Shlain proposes that the visionary artist is the first member of a culture to see the world in a new way. Then, nearly simultaneously, a revolutionary physicist discovers a new way to think about the world. Escorting the reader through the classical, medieval, Renaissance and modern eras, Shlain shows how the artists' images when superimposed on the physicists' concepts create a compelling fit. Throughout, Shlain juxtaposes the specific art works of famous artists alongside the world-changing ideas of great thinkers. Giotto and Galileo, da Vinci and Newton, Picasso and Einstein, Duchamp and Bohr, Matisse and Heisenberg, and Monet and Minkowski are just a few of the provocative pairings.
Nick Bostrom: On the Simulation Argument
23 minutes
MY LIST
Interview with Nick Bostrom at the Future of Humanity Institute Oxford University. He argues that at least one of the following propositions is true: (1) the human species is very likely to go extinct before reaching a "posthuman" stage; (2) any posthuman civilization is extremely unlikely to run a significant number of simulations of their evolutionary history (or variations thereof); (3) we are almost certainly living in a computer simulation. It follows that the belief that there is a significant chance that we will one day become posthumans who run ancestor-simulations is false, unless we are currently living in a simulation. A number of other consequences of this result are also discussed.