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Aaron Levie Alain de Botton Alan Watts Alexis Ohanian Andreas Antonopoulos Andrew DeSantis Andrew Lo Arthur De Vany Aubrey de Grey Balaji Srinivasan Ben Bratton Bill Bryson Bryan Caplan Carl Jung Chamath Palihapitiya Chris Arnade Chris Sacca Daniel Dennett Daniel Kahneman David Linden David Sacks Derek Parfit Derek Sivers Douglas Hofstadter E.O. Wilson Elon Musk Eric Weinstein Ezra Klein Gad Saad George Gilder George Lakoff Ido Portal J.D. Vance James Altucher James Gleick Jason Silva Jeff Bezos Jim Simons Jocko Willink John Hagelin John Nash Jordan Peterson Josh Waitzkin Julia Galef Kelly Starrett Kevin Kelly Kevin Rose Kim Scott Kumar Thangudu Leonard Shlain Malcolm Gladwell Marc Andreessen Maria Konnikova Maria Popova Matt Ridley Michael Hiltzik Michael Sandel Naval Ravikant Neil Strauss Neil Turok Nick Bostrom Nick Szabo Noah Kagan Noam Chomsky Oliver Sacks P.D. Mangan Paul Bloom Paul Graham Peter Attia Peter Diamandis Peter Thiel Reid Hoffman Rhonda Patrick Richard Feynman Richard Rorty Robert Caro Robert Cialdini Robert Greene Robert Kurzban Robert Langer Robert McNamara Robert Putnam Robert Sapolsky Rory Sutherland Ryan Holiday Sam Altman Sam Harris Scott Adams Scott Belsky Scott Galloway Seth Godin Shawn Baker Shinzen Young Siddhartha Mukherjee Simon Sinek Slavoj Zizek Stephen Wolfram Steve Jobs Steven Pinker Stewart Butterfield Ted Nelson Tiago Forte Tim Ferriss Tim Urban Timothy Gowers Timothy Pychyl Tyler Cowen Vaclav Smil Valter Longo Venkatesh Rao Vinay Gupta Vincent Dignan Will MacAskill Wim Hof Yanis Varoufakis Yuval Harari
Steve Jobs: On Life at 2005 Stanford Commencement Address
15 minutes
MY LIST
Drawing from some of the most pivotal points in his life, Steve Jobs, chief executive officer and co-founder of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios, urged graduates to pursue their dreams and see the opportunities in life's setbacks -- including death itself -- at the university's 114th Commencement on June 12, 2005.
Leonard Shlain: On Art & Physics: Parallel Visions in Space, Time & Light
54 minutes
MY LIST
Leonard Shlain proposes that the visionary artist is the first member of a culture to see the world in a new way. Then, nearly simultaneously, a revolutionary physicist discovers a new way to think about the world. Escorting the reader through the classical, medieval, Renaissance and modern eras, Shlain shows how the artists' images when superimposed on the physicists' concepts create a compelling fit. Throughout, Shlain juxtaposes the specific art works of famous artists alongside the world-changing ideas of great thinkers. Giotto and Galileo, da Vinci and Newton, Picasso and Einstein, Duchamp and Bohr, Matisse and Heisenberg, and Monet and Minkowski are just a few of the provocative pairings.
Yanis Varoufakis: On The Future of Capitalism
119 minutes
MY LIST
We all know Varoufakis as the former Greek Finance Minister and media sensation who stood up to Europe in the fight against austerity. His lecture will discuss themes from his new book, "And The Weak Suffer What They Must?," including the origins of a crisis that has affected not only Greece, but all of Europe. <br> The Robert Heilbroner Memorial Lecture on the Future of Capitalism: The Heilbroner lecture honors the work of Robert Heilbroner, who was both a student and a professor in the economics department of The New School for Social Research. This event is dedicated to understanding questions of economic justice and how the profit-seeking activities of private firms might also serve broader social goals. To use Heilbroner’s words, "capitalism’s uniqueness in history lies in its continuously self-generated change, but it is this very dynamism that is the system’s chief enemy."
Balaji Srinivasan: On Exiting Broken Systems
16 minutes
MY LIST
Balaji Srinivasan at Startup School 2013. This is a great talk about broken systems and how to navigate a situation in which you are stuck in a system that is broken beyond repair.
Malcolm Gladwell: On Harvard Endowments, Satire, and more with Tyler Cowen
91 minutes
MY LIST
Journalist, author, and podcaster Malcolm Gladwell joins Tyler for a conversation on Joyce Gladwell, Caribbean identity, satire as a weapon, Daniel Ellsberg and Edward Snowden, Harvard’s under-theorized endowment, why early childhood intervention is overrated, long-distance running, and Malcolm’s happy risk-averse career going from one "fur-lined rat hole to the next."
Balaji Srinivasan: On The Network State
32 minutes
MY LIST
This is a follow up to the Balaji talk at Startup School on exiting systems. He explores the dynamics at play as power shifts from the nation-states to other systems.
Sam Altman: How to Build Products Users Love (Kevin Hale)
48 minutes
MY LIST
Kevin Hale, Founder of Wufoo and Partner at Y Combinator, explains how to build products that create a passionate user base invested in your startup's success.
Sam Altman: Legal and Accounting Basics for Startups (Kirsty Nathoo, Carolynn Levy)
48 minutes
MY LIST
There's a lot that goes behind the scenes in running a startup. Getting the legal, finance (equity allocation, vesting), accounting, and other overhead right will save you a lot of pain in the long run. Kirsty Nathoo, CFO at Y Combinator, and Carolynn Levy, General Counsel at Y Combinator, cover these very important topics in this lecture.
Timothy Pychyl: On Helping Students Who Procrastinate
58 minutes
MY LIST
Dr. Tim Pychyl led a discussion about academic procrastination and strategies for change. The focus was on discussing what students are telling us about their procrastination and how we might help them help themselves.
Yuval Harari: On Drugs & the Meaning of Life
13 minutes
MY LIST
Historian & professor, Yuval Noah Harari, discusses psychedelics & the human conception of the meaning of life in a conversation with Dan Ariely.
Yuval Harari: On the Rise of Homo Deus
91 minutes
MY LIST
In conversation with Kamal Ahmed, the BBC’s economics editor, Harari examined the political and economic revolutions that look set to transform society, as technology continues its exponential advance. What will happen when artificial intelligence takes over most of the jobs that people do? Will our liberal values of equality and universal human rights survive the creation of a massive new class of individuals who are economically useless? And when Google and Facebook know our political preferences better than we do ourselves, will democratic elections become redundant? As the 21st century progresses, not only our society and economy but our bodies and minds could be revolutionised by new technologies such as genetic engineering, nanotechnology and brain-computer interfaces. After a few countries master the enhancement of bodies and brains, will they conquer the planet while the rest of humankind is driven to extinction?
Yuval Harari: On why humans run the world at TED
17 minutes
MY LIST
Seventy thousand years ago, our human ancestors were insignificant animals, just minding their own business in a corner of Africa with all the other animals. But now, few would disagree that humans dominate planet Earth; we've spread to every continent, and our actions determine the fate of other animals (and possibly Earth itself). How did we get from there to here? Historian Yuval Noah Harari suggests a surprising reason for the rise of humanity.
Sam Altman: Sales and Marketing; How to Talk to Investors (Tyler Bosmeny)
48 minutes
MY LIST
Three segments in this lecture:Tyler Bosmeny, founder and CEO of Clever, starts off today's lecture with an overview of the Sales Funnel, and how to get to your first $1 Million. Michael Seibel, founder of Justin.tv and Socialcam and Partner at Y Combinator, then goes over how to talk to investors - the pitch. Dalton Caldwell, founder of imeem and App.net and Partner at Y Combiantor, and Qasar Younis, founder of Talkbin and Partner at Y Combinator, then perform an investor meeting roleplay to give you a taste of how it actually might look behind the scenes.
Sam Altman: Later-stage Advice (Sam Altman)
48 minutes
MY LIST
Sam caps off the How to Start a Startup series with things you should ignore when you start, but become important a year in.
Sam Altman: Hiring and Culture, Part 2 (Patrick and John Collison, Ben Silbermann)
50 minutes
MY LIST
Stripe and Pinterest - two companies well known for their strong cultures. The founders - John Collison, Patrick Collison, and Ben Silberman - take Q&A from Sam in part 2 of Hiring and Culture.
Sam Altman: How to Operate (Keith Rabois)
46 minutes
MY LIST
What should the CEO be doing on a day to day basis? How do you make sure the company is moving in the right direction? Keith Rabois, Partner at Khosla Ventures and former COO of Square, tackles the nitty gritty - How to Operate. Lots of actionable takeaways from this lecture!
Sam Altman: How to Design Hardware Products (Hosain Rahman)
47 minutes
MY LIST
Hosain Rahman, CEO and Founder of Jawbone, covers the design process for building hardware products users love.
Sam Altman: How to Run a User Interview (Emmett Shear)
46 minutes
MY LIST
Building product, and talking to users. In the early stages of your startup, those are the two things you should focus on. In this lecture, Emmett Shear, Founder and CEO of Justin.tv and Twitch, covers the latter. What can you learn by talking to users that you can’t learn by looking at data? What questions should you ask? How can user interviews define or redefine your product goals?
Sam Altman: How to Manage (Ben Horowitz)
49 minutes
MY LIST
You are not the only one whom your decisions impact. Ben Horowitz, founder of Andreessen Horowitz and Opsware, discusses this important management perspective that founders miss, with, of course, the gratuitous rap lyric or two sprinkled in.
Sam Altman: How to be a Great Founder (Reid Hoffman)
49 minutes
MY LIST
So you've learned how to get started, how to raise money, how to build products, and how to grow. Reid Hoffman, founder of LinkedIn and Partner at Greylock Ventures, addresses many of the questions and confusions that might be cropping up - How to be a Great Founder.
Sam Altman: Building Product, Talking to Users, and Growing (Adora Cheung)
52 minutes
MY LIST
So you have an idea. How do you go from zero users to many users?Adora Cheung, Founder of Homejoy, covers Building Product, Talking to Users, and Growing, in Lecture 4 of How to Start a Startup.
Sam Altman: Building for the Enterprise (Aaron Levie)
46 minutes
MY LIST
Aaron Levie - founder of Box, enterprise master, Twitter comedic genius. In this lecture, he'll convince you to Build for the Enterprise.
Sam Altman: How to Raise Money (Marc Andreessen, Ron Conway, Parker Conrad)
50 minutes
MY LIST
Sam leads a panel Q&A on Fundraising in this lecture with Marc Andreessen, Founder of Netscape and Andreessen Horowitz, Ron Conway, Founder of SV Angel, and Parker Conrad, Founder of Zenefits.
Sam Altman: Culture (Brian Chesky, Alfred Lin)
50 minutes
MY LIST
Brian Chesky, Founder of Airbnb, and Alfred Lin, Former COO of Zappos and Partner at Sequoia Capital discuss how to build a great company culture.
Sam Altman: How to Get Started, Doing Things that Don't Scale, Press
52 minutes
MY LIST
Stanley Tang, Founder of Doordash, covers How to Get Started. Walker Williams, Founder of Teespring, covers Doing things that Don't Scale. Justin Kan, Founder of TwitchTV and Partner at Y Combinator, covers Press.
Sam Altman: How to Raise Money (Marc Andreessen, Ron Conway, Parker Conrad)
50 minutes
MY LIST
Sam leads a panel Q&A on Fundraising in this lecture with Marc Andreessen, Founder of Netscape and Andreessen Horowitz, Ron Conway, Founder of SV Angel, and Parker Conrad, Founder of Zenefits.
Sam Altman: Growth (Alex Schultz)
47 minutes
MY LIST
Alex Schultz gives an overview of Growth for startups, speaking from a position of authority as the VP of Growth at Facebook.
Sam Altman: Competition is for Losers (Peter Thiel)
50 minutes
MY LIST
Peter Thiel, founder of Paypal and Palantir, discusses business strategy and monopoly theory in "Competition is For Losers".
Douglas Hofstadter: 1- MIT Godel Escher Bach
62 minutes
MY LIST
MIT's course discussing the concepts described in Douglas Hofstadter's masterpiece - Godel Escher Bach.
Sam Altman: Before the Startup (Paul Graham)
48 minutes
MY LIST
Paul Graham delivers an informative (and highly amusing) talk, addressing counterintuitive parts of startups, in Lecture 3 of How to Start a Startup.
Sam Altman: How to Start a Startup (Sam Altman, Dustin Moskovitz)
43 minutes
MY LIST
Sam Altman, President of Y Combinator, and Dustin Moskovitz, Cofounder of Facebook, Asana, and Good Ventures, kick off the How to Start a Startup Course. Sam covers the first 2 of the 4 Key Areas: Ideas, Products, Teams and Execution; and Dustin discusses Why to Start a Startup.
Sam Altman: Team and Execution (Sam Altman)
46 minutes
MY LIST
Sam Altman finishes up "Ideas, Products, Teams and Execution" by covering Team and Execution, in Lecture 2 of How to Start a Startup.
Douglas Hofstadter: 6- MIT Godel Escher Bach
107 minutes
MY LIST
MIT's course discussing the concepts described in Douglas Hofstadter's masterpiece - Godel Escher Bach.
Douglas Hofstadter: 5- MIT Godel Escher Bach
98 minutes
MY LIST
MIT's course discussing the concepts described in Douglas Hofstadter's masterpiece - Godel Escher Bach.
Douglas Hofstadter: 2- MIT Godel Escher Bach
76 minutes
MY LIST
MIT's course discussing the concepts described in Douglas Hofstadter's masterpiece - Godel Escher Bach.
Douglas Hofstadter: 4- MIT Godel Escher Bach
106 minutes
MY LIST
MIT's course discussing the concepts described in Douglas Hofstadter's masterpiece - Godel Escher Bach.
Douglas Hofstadter: 3- MIT Godel Escher Bach
60 minutes
MY LIST
MIT's course discussing the concepts described in Douglas Hofstadter's masterpiece - Godel Escher Bach.
Jordan Peterson: The Great Sacrifice: Abraham and Isaac
153 minutes
MY LIST
In this, the final lecture of the Summer 2017 12-part series The Psychological Significance of the Biblical Stories, we encounter, first, Hagar's banishment to the desert with Ishmael and then the demand made by God to Abraham for the sacrifice of Isaac.To sacrifice now is to gain later: perhaps the greatest of human discoveries. What, then, should best be sacrificed? And what might be the greatest gain? There are few eternal questions more profound and difficult.In this lecture, I read an excerpt from Chapter 7 of my new book, 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos, now available for pre-order at Amazon.ca (http://amzn.to/2wkb7MY) and Amazon.com (http://amzn.to/2x1hfXF).
Jordan Peterson: Adam and Eve: Self-Consciousness, Evil, and Death
152 minutes
MY LIST
I turned my attention in this lecture to the older of the two creation accounts in Genesis: the story of Adam and Eve. In its few short paragraphs, it covers: <br>1. the emergence of human self-consciousness; <br>2. mankind's attendant realization of vulnerability, mortality, and death; <br>3. the origin of the capacity for willful evil, as the ability to exploit that newly-realized vulnerability; <br>4. the emergence of shame as a consequence of that realization; <br>5. the shrinking from divine destiny that occurred when shame emerged; and <br>6. the beginning of true history, with the self-conscious toil that life in history entails. <br>The only story that can perhaps match it in terms of impact per sentence is that of Cain and Abel, which we discuss in the next lecture: number five in this twelve part series.
Jordan Peterson: Sodom and Gomorrah
2 minutes
MY LIST
Often interpreted as an injunction against homosexuality (particularly by those simultaneously claiming identity as Christians and opposed to that orientation), the stories of the angels who visit Abraham, bless him, and then rain destruction on Sodom and Gomorrah are more truly a warning against mistreatment of the stranger and impulsive, dysregulated, sybaritic conduct. Abraham opens his heart and hearth to the stranger. The denizens of Lot’s soon-to-be lost cities threaten them with violent rape. God exacts a terrible retribution. The warning is clear.
Jordan Peterson: Abraham: Father of Nations
148 minutes
MY LIST
The Abrahamic adventures continue with this, the tenth lecture in my 12-part initial Biblical lecture series. Abraham's life is presented as a series of encapsulated narratives, punctuated by sacrifice, and the rekindling of his covenant with God. This seems to reflect the pattern of human life: the journey towards a goal, or destination, and the completion of a stage or epoch of life, followed by the necessity of revaluation and reconsideration of identity, prior to the next step forward. Abraham, for his part, makes the sacrifices necessary to continue to walk with God, or before God (as the terminology in this section has it). It is this decision that allows him to transcend the vicissitudes of life, and to take his role as the father of nations.
Jordan Peterson: The Call to Abraham
155 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, I tell the story of Abraham, who heeds the call of God to leave what was familiar behind and to journey into unknown lands. The man portrayed in the Bible as the father of nations moves forward into the world. He encounters the worst of nature (famine), society (the tyranny of Egypt) and the envy of the powerful, who desire his wife. There is nothing easy about Abraham's life. Instead, he is portrayed both as a real man, with serious problems, and a hero, who overcomes tremendous obstacles to establish himself in the world. His covenant with God is an Ark. His decision to aim at the highest good he can conceptualize places an aura of magic around the events of his life, despite their harshness. He's a model for life in the world as it is, not as we wish it would be.
Jordan Peterson: The Phenomenology of the Divine
160 minutes
MY LIST
In the next series of stories, the Biblical patriarch Abram (later: Abraham) enters into a covenant with God. The history of Israel proper begins with these stories. Abram heeds the call to adventure, journeys courageously away from his country and family into the foreign and unknown, encounters the disasters of nature and the tyranny of mankind and maintains his relationship with the God who has sent him forth. He becomes in this manner a light in the world, and a father of nations. How is this all to be understood? I am attempting in this lecture to determine precisely that. How are we, as modern people, to make sense of the idea of the God who reveals himself to a personality? How can we relate the details of the Abramic stories to our own lives, in the current world? In what frame of reference can these stories be seen to make sense, and to reveal their meaning?
Jordan Peterson: Abrahamic Stories, with Matthieu & Jonathan Pageau
85 minutes
MY LIST
I had this 90 minute discussion with Jonathan Pageau, carver of Orthodox icons and YouTube broadcaster, as well as his brother Matthieu, who recently finished a draft of a book on the bible. I did so as part of the background research I was doing for the 8th lecture in my series The Psychological Significance of the Biblical Stories. We talked about the nature of the narrative landscape of the Bible, focusing on the Abrahamic stories, which constitute the subject material for that 8th and other forthcoming lectures.
Jordan Peterson: The Psychology of the Flood
155 minutes
MY LIST
The story of Noah and the Ark is next in the Genesis sequence. This is a more elaborated tale than the initial creation account, or the story of Adam and Eve or Cain and Abel. However, it cannot be understood in its true depth without some investigation into what the motif of the flood means, psychologically, and an analysis of how that motif is informed by the order/chaos dichotomy, as well as by the idea of an involuntary voyage to the underworld or confrontation with the dragon. In consequence, this lecture concentrates almost exclusively on Psychology: How is an encounter with the unknown to be understood, conceptually? How and why is that represented with themes such as the underworld voyage, the dragon fight, or the flood?
Jordan Peterson: Cain and Abel: The Hostile Brothers
151 minutes
MY LIST
Bible Series V: Cain and Abel: The Hostile Brothers. The account of Cain and Abel is remarkable for its unique combination of brevity and depth. In a few short sentences, it outlines two diametrically opposed modes of being -- both responses to the emergence of self-consciousness and the knowledge of good and evil detailed in story of Adam and Eve. <br>Cain's mode of being -- resentful, arrogant and murderous -- arises because his sacrifices are rejected by God. This means that his attempts to give up something valuable in the present to ensure prosperity in the future are insufficient. He fails, in consequence, to thrive, as he believes he should, and becomes bitter, resentful and murderous. <br>Abel's mode of being is characterized, by contrast, by proper sacrifice -- by the establishment of balance between present action and future benefit. This ensures his personal and social success, accruing over time. Unfortunately, it also makes him the target of Cain's malevolence. <br>This great short story is relevant personally, on the level of the family, and politically, all with equal force, all simultaneously.
Jordan Peterson: Walking with God: Noah and the Flood
152 minutes
MY LIST
Life at the individual and the societal level is punctuated by crisis and catastrophe. This stark truth finds its narrative representation in the widely-distributed universal motif of the flood. Mircea Eliade, the great Romanian historian of religion, noted that flood stories identify two reasons for the destruction: (1) the tendency of complex things to fall apart of their own accord; (2) the proclivity of human beings to speed up that process by sinning, or missing the mark (by engaging in self-evident corruption, or by failing to attend to what cries out for attention). The Genesis story clearly states that Noah and his family are to be spared from impending disaster because Noah “walks with God,” as Adam did before the Fall. In this lecture, the 7th in the series, I intermingle the story of Noah and his survival with elements of the Sermon on the Mount, making the effort to explain to a modern audience why careful moral attitude and behavior comprises the best defence against the righteous anger of God.
Jordan Peterson: God and the Hierarchy of Authority
146 minutes
MY LIST
Although I thought I might get to Genesis II in this third lecture, and begin talking about Adam & Eve, it didn't turn out that way. There was more to be said about the idea of God as creator (with the Word as the process underlying the act of creation). I didn't mind, because it is very important to get God and the Creation of the Universe right before moving on. In this lecture, I tried to outline something like this: for anything to be, there has to be a substrate (call it a potential) from which it emerges, a structure that provides the possibility of imposing order on that substrate, and the act of ordering, itself. So the first is something like the precosmogonic chaos (implicitly feminine); the second, God the Father; the third, what the Christian West has portrayed as the Son (the Word of Truth).
Tyler Cowen: Conversations with Tyler: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on Segregation, Islam and Basketball
81 minutes
MY LIST
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar joins Tyler Cowen for a conversation on segregation, Islam, Harlem vs. LA, Earl Manigault, jazz, fighting Bruce Lee, Kareem’s conservatism, dancing with Thelonious Monk, and why no one today can shoot a skyhook.
Jordan Peterson: Genesis 1: Chaos & Order
152 minutes
MY LIST
Lecture II in my Psychological Significance of the Biblical Stories from May 23 at Isabel Bader Theatre, Toronto. In this lecture, I present Genesis 1, which presents the idea that a pre-existent cognitive structure (God the Father) uses the Logos, the Christian Word, the second Person of the Trinity, to generate habitable order out of precosmogonic chaos at the beginning of time. It is in that Image that Man and Woman are created -- indicating, perhaps, that it is (1) through speech that we participate in the creation of the cosmos of experience and (2) that what true speech creates is good. It is a predicate of Western culture that each individual partakes in some manner in the divine. This is the true significance of consciousness, which has a world-creating aspect. Q & A Starts: 1:59:00