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Aaron Levie Alain de Botton Alan Watts Alexis Ohanian Andreas Antonopoulos Andrew DeSantis Andrew Lo Arthur De Vany Aubrey de Grey Balaji Srinivasan Ben Bratton Bill Bryson Bryan Caplan Carl Jung Chamath Palihapitiya Chris Arnade Chris Sacca Daniel Dennett Daniel Kahneman David Linden David Sacks Derek Parfit Derek Sivers Douglas Hofstadter E.O. Wilson Elon Musk Eric Weinstein Ezra Klein Gad Saad George Gilder George Lakoff Ido Portal J.D. Vance James Altucher James Gleick Jason Silva Jeff Bezos Jim Simons Jocko Willink John Hagelin John Nash Jordan Peterson Josh Waitzkin Julia Galef Kelly Starrett Kevin Kelly Kevin Rose Kim Scott Kumar Thangudu Leonard Shlain Malcolm Gladwell Marc Andreessen Maria Konnikova Maria Popova Matt Ridley Michael Hiltzik Michael Sandel Naval Ravikant Neil Strauss Neil Turok Nick Bostrom Nick Szabo Noah Kagan Noam Chomsky Oliver Sacks P.D. Mangan Paul Bloom Paul Graham Peter Attia Peter Diamandis Peter Thiel Reid Hoffman Rhonda Patrick Richard Feynman Richard Rorty Robert Caro Robert Cialdini Robert Greene Robert Kurzban Robert Langer Robert McNamara Robert Putnam Robert Sapolsky Rory Sutherland Ryan Holiday Sam Altman Sam Harris Scott Adams Scott Belsky Scott Galloway Seth Godin Shawn Baker Shinzen Young Siddhartha Mukherjee Simon Sinek Slavoj Zizek Stephen Wolfram Steve Jobs Steven Pinker Stewart Butterfield Ted Nelson Tiago Forte Tim Ferriss Tim Urban Timothy Gowers Timothy Pychyl Tyler Cowen Vaclav Smil Valter Longo Venkatesh Rao Vinay Gupta Vincent Dignan Will MacAskill Wim Hof Yanis Varoufakis Yuval Harari
Richard Feynman: The Law of Gravitation
56 minutes
MY LIST
The Messenger Lectures are a prestigious series of talks given by leading scholars and public figures at Cornell University. They were founded in 1924 by a gift from Hiram Messenger and are regarded as one of the most important of Cornell's extracurricular activities.
Eric Weinstein: On Fake News, Trump, and the Mathematical Mind with Dave Rubin
100 minutes
MY LIST
Eric Weinstein (Managing Director, Thiel Capital) joins Dave Rubin to discuss Trump, the 4 kinds of fake news, complex mathematical theories, and more. These are two of our favorites.
Jason Silva: On We are the Gods Now
37 minutes
MY LIST
JASON SILVA is an extraordinary new breed of philosopher who meshes philosophical wisdom of the ages with an infectious optimism for the future. Combining intriguing insights and a mastery of digital filmmaking, Jason delivers philosophical shots of espresso, which unravel the incredible possibilities the future has to offer the human race. Jason draws from his experiences as a television personality, a media artist, a filmmaker, and a techno-philosopher to share his inspirational take on scientific and technological advancements, the evolution of intelligence, and the human condition.
Jordan Peterson: On SJW and Psychology at Joe Rogan Experience #877
170 minutes
MY LIST
Jordan Peterson's first chat with Joe Rogan. A tour de force, as always with JP.<br>0:00:00 - Castro, Trudeau talk.<br>0:01:40 - Gender Pronoun discussion.<br>0:09:40 - How did we get to this point where we're repeating these patterns (deadly) like Marxism from the past?? <br>0:14:15 - Why these people tend lean to this thinking (equality of outcome obsession).<br>0:19:00 - Hypocrisy and Inconsistency of the Left.<br>0:20:00 - Wage Gap BTFO<br>0:26:45 - One bit answers to everything (from the Left).<br>0:30:00 - Joe is dumbfounded by arguments from the Left about gender.<br>0:34:15 - People who have issues w/ Pronouns are fraction of fraction of Trans-people. (Incoherent claims).<br>0:35:00 - Story of Wellesley student that became man (for identity) then was denounced by own community. CHAOS.<br>0:36:40 - Getting caught in the infinite rainbow. Once everyone is marginalized, nobody is left.<br>0:38:40 - Can't have society unless everyone at least sacrifices a little bit of your individuality.<br>0:42:50 - SJWs enforcing their thinking aggressively (explained).<br>0:47:55 - Racial biases in people. Mandatory, unconscious racism training and re-education programs.<br>0:53:50 - How did we get here (asks Joe)?? (Jordan explains).<br>0:57:00 - Ideologies (seemingly innocuous) can take you down dangerous roads. (Those I disagree with are enemies).<br>0:59:00 - How millions perished in Soviet Russia. Posters saying: "Don't forget, it's wrong to eat your children"<br>1:01:40 - Why do these patterns repeat themselves (asks Joe)? "We like things simple". (who's a friend or enemy).<br>1:02:25 - Yale cupcake student BTFO....plus Halloween talk.<br>1:06:45 - Maps of Meaning class...plus how to make people less afraid.<br>1:09:30 - When did all this start (asks Joe)?? <br>1:10:50 - What exactly is going on with women's studies which is fostering radical revolution (asks Joe)??<br>1:14:10 - SJWs mentality (resentment for the burden of being).<br>1:17:30 - The University=ideological factories. Admins conspire to steal future earnings of students. Indentured Servitude<br>1:20:30 - Ask a professor if they're a Marxist. Gulag Archipelago=required reading.<br>1:22:20 - Warren Farrell questions income disparity.<br>1:24:30 - Jordan accused of hate speech.<br>1:28:25 - Jordan's YouTube presence.<br>1:31:55 - Radical Left eating its own.<br>1:34:45 - Are you cynical about the future (asks Joe)??<br>1:37:40 - Long discussion about online learning and teaching.<br>1:48:50 - Jordan talks about his consulting experiences and his self-authoring suite.<br>2:02:00 - Jordan talks about reconciling being a scientist and deeply religious at the same time. (Christ=meta-hero).<br>2:09:25 - Jordan talks about comic book archetypes and universe.<br>2:16:10 - Joe asks why Cross-fit or Yoga is used as substitute for Religion (seeking fellowship, discipline, etc).<br>2:21:00 - Tensions between dogmatic element and spiritual element.<br>2:26:30 - Ideology is a parasite on religious substructures (J.K. Rowling understood).<br>2:29:30 - Capitalism isn't the problem, it's Evil. Well, yes, but...(Hurricane Katrina). God is what transcends your knowledge.<br>2:32:30 - Is the problem the term 'God'?<br>2:34:15 - Do these stories exists because there is a need for this order? (Yes, how it is we must live. Order, to avoid hell).<br>2:36:00 - Apocalypse coming? No, it's always here.<br>2:38:55 - Is frustrating not getting support for Jordan's actions?<br>2:40:10 - Intelligent != healthy or moral. Story of low I.Q. lady.<br>2:43:25 - Trying putting yourself in Auschwitz camp guard role. If opportunity presented itself, I'm not doing it.<br>2:44:40 - Truth no matter what. My language. Not saying your words or being compelled to. Legal talk.<br>2:47:50 - Closing Questions to Jordan. (SORT YOURSELF OUT, MARSHALL YOUR ARGUMENTS).
Neil Turok: On The Astonishing Simplicity of Everything
83 minutes
MY LIST
In October 2015 Neil Turok, director of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics (PI) located in Waterloo, Canada opened the new season of the PI Public Lecture Series with a talk about the remarkable simplicity that underlies nature. Professor Turok, who was born in South Africa and now lives in Canada, discussed how this simplicity at the largest and tiniest scales of the Universe is pointing toward new avenues of research and revolutionary advances in technology.
Tim Ferriss: On Super Learning and Pushing the Limits from Impact Theory
45 minutes
MY LIST
Tim’s brand new book is Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines and Habits of Billionaires, Icons and World-Class Performers. In this episode, Tim dives deep into many of the lessons and strategies he’s learned over the years from his world-class guests and constant self-experimentation. <br> Tom and Tim discuss the driving force behind their greatest superpowers. [4:04] <br> Tim talks about how you can test the impossible in 17 questions. [7:45] <br> Tim defines red/blue team strategies and how to apply them. [13:36] <br> Tim explains why setting low expectations for creativity leads to higher performance. [18:50] <br> Tom and Tim talk about what it means to copyright your faults. [26:52] <br> Tim emphasizes the importance of writing morning pages. [30:17] <br> Tim talks about the most important takeaways from his new book. [31:31] <br> Tim reveals an absurd goal that he has not shared with anyone else. [38:30]
Daniel Kahneman: On Thinking, Fast and Slow
62 minutes
MY LIST
Engaging the reader in a lively conversation about how we think, Kahneman reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our business and our personal lives—and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble. Thinking, Fast and Slow will transform the way you think about thinking.
Peter Thiel: On Why Competition Is For Losers
50 minutes
MY LIST
The great secret of our time is that there are still uncharted frontiers to explore and new inventions to create. In Zero to One, legendary entrepreneur and investor Peter Thiel shows how we can find singular ways to create those new things. <br>Thiel begins with the contrarian premise that we live in an age of technological stagnation, even if we’re too distracted by shiny mobile devices to notice. Information technology has improved rapidly, but there is no reason why progress should be limited to computers or Silicon Valley. Progress can be achieved in any industry or area of business. It comes from the most important skill that every leader must master: learning to think for yourself.<br>Doing what someone else already knows how to do takes the world from 1 to n, adding more of something familiar. But when you do something new, you go from 0 to 1. The next Bill Gates will not build an operating system. The next Larry Page or Sergey Brin won’t make a search engine. Tomorrow’s champions will not win by competing ruthlessly in today’s marketplace. They will escape competition altogether, because their businesses will be unique.
Robert Sapolsky: Emergence and Complexity
102 minutes
MY LIST
Professor Robert Sapolsky gives a lecture on emergence and complexity. He details how a small difference at one place in nature can have a huge effect on a system as time goes on. He calls this idea fractal magnification and applies it to many different systems that exist throughout nature.
Michael Sandel: THE MORAL SIDE OF MURDER
54 minutes
MY LIST
PART ONE: THE MORAL SIDE OF MURDER <br>If you had to choose between (1) killing one person to save the lives of five others and (2) doing nothing even though you knew that five people would die right before your eyes if you did nothing—what would you do? What would be the right thing to do? Thats the hypothetical scenario Professor Michael Sandel uses to launch his course on moral reasoning. After the majority of students votes for killing the one person in order to save the lives of five others, Sandel presents three similar moral conundrums—each one artfully designed to make the decision more difficult. As students stand up to defend their conflicting choices, it becomes clear that the assumptions behind our moral reasoning are often contradictory, and the question of what is right and what is wrong is not always black and white. <br>PART TWO: THE CASE FOR CANNIBALISM <br>Sandel introduces the principles of utilitarian philosopher, Jeremy Bentham, with a famous nineteenth century legal case involving a shipwrecked crew of four. After nineteen days lost at sea, the captain decides to kill the weakest amongst them, the young cabin boy, so that the rest can feed on his blood and body to survive. The case sets up a classroom debate about the moral validity of utilitarianism—and its doctrine that the right thing to do is whatever produces "the greatest good for the greatest number."
Jordan Peterson: Context and Background
151 minutes
MY LIST
Peterson discusses the context within which the theory he is delineating through this course emerge: that of the cold war. What is belief? Why is it so important to people? Why will they fight to protect it? He proposes that belief unites a culture's expectations and desires with the actions of its people, and that the match between those two allows for cooperative action and maintains emotional stability. He suggests, further, that culture has a deep narrative structure, presenting the world as a forum for action, with characters representing the individual, the known, and the unknown -- or the individual, culture and nature -- or the individual, order and chaos.
Robert Greene: On The 48 Laws of Power
28 minutes
MY LIST
Host Barry Kibrick sits down with Robet Greene, author of the world famous "48 Laws of Power", to talk about what it really means to have power and be powerful in a true sense.
Steve Jobs: On Life at 2005 Stanford Commencement Address
15 minutes
MY LIST
Drawing from some of the most pivotal points in his life, Steve Jobs, chief executive officer and co-founder of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios, urged graduates to pursue their dreams and see the opportunities in life's setbacks -- including death itself -- at the university's 114th Commencement on June 12, 2005.
Leonard Shlain: On The Alphabet vs. The Goddess Lecture
75 minutes
MY LIST
In this groundbreaking book, Leonard Shlain, author of the bestselling "Art & Physics," proposes that the process of learning alphabetic literacy rewired the human brain, with profound consequences for culture. Making remarkable connections across a wide range of subjects including brain function, anthropology, history, and religion, Shlain argues that literacy reinforced the brain's linear, abstract, predominantly masculine left hemisphere at the expense of the holistic, iconic feminine right one. This shift upset the balance between men and women initiating the disappearance of goddesses, the abhorrence of images, and, in literacy's early stages, the decline of women's political status. Patriarchy and misogyny followed.
Alain de Botton: On Status Anxiety
38 minutes
MY LIST
Alain de Botton discusses his book Status Anxiety which examines our fears over what others think about us and about how we are judged to be either a success or failure. As always, de Botton explores the history and impact of the topic. One would be wise to examine status signalling behaviours in their own lives. For better or worse, they are ever-present in our society.
Steve Jobs: On How to Start a Business
20 minutes
MY LIST
Steve Jobs founded NeXT, Inc. in 1985 after he was forced out of Apple, along with a few of his co-workers. The purpose of the company was to developed and manufactured a series of computer workstations for the higher education and business markets.
Kevin Kelly: On 12 Inevitable Tech Forces That Will Shape Our Future at SXSW 2016
55 minutes
MY LIST
In a few years we’ll have artificial intelligence that can accomplish professional human tasks. There is nothing we can do to stop this. In addition our lives will be totally 100% tracked by ourselves and others. This too is inevitable. Indeed much of what will happen in the next 30 years is inevitable, driven by technological trends which are already in motion, and are impossible to halt without halting civilization. Some of what is coming may seem scary, like ubiquitous tracking, or robots replacing humans. Others innovations seem more desirable, such as an on-demand economy, and virtual reality in the home. And some that is coming like network crime and anonymous hacking will be society’s new scourges. Yet both the desirable good and the undesirable bad of these emerging technologies all obey the same formation principles.
Naval Ravikant: On Open Source and Bitcoins
21 minutes
MY LIST
Naval Ravikant (Angel List) speaks about the future of open source and bitcoins. This is a great introduction to the topic. It's as relevant as ever having been recorded three years ago. Naval is one of the best in the game, a must-watch.
Andreas Antonopoulos: On The Future Of Money
64 minutes
MY LIST
Andreas M. Antonopoulos gives an enlightening speech about the future of money at Zentrum Karl der Grosse in Zurich - 30th March 2016
Yanis Varoufakis: On The Future of Capitalism
119 minutes
MY LIST
We all know Varoufakis as the former Greek Finance Minister and media sensation who stood up to Europe in the fight against austerity. His lecture will discuss themes from his new book, "And The Weak Suffer What They Must?," including the origins of a crisis that has affected not only Greece, but all of Europe. <br> The Robert Heilbroner Memorial Lecture on the Future of Capitalism: The Heilbroner lecture honors the work of Robert Heilbroner, who was both a student and a professor in the economics department of The New School for Social Research. This event is dedicated to understanding questions of economic justice and how the profit-seeking activities of private firms might also serve broader social goals. To use Heilbroner’s words, "capitalism’s uniqueness in history lies in its continuously self-generated change, but it is this very dynamism that is the system’s chief enemy."