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Daniel Dennett
Daniel Clement Dennett III (born March 28, 1942) is an American philosopher, writer, and cognitive scientist whose research centers on the philosophy of mind, philosophy of science, and philosophy of biology, particularly as those fields relate to evolutionary biology and cognitive science.
Daniel Dennett: On the Evolution of the Mind, Consciousness and AI
90 minutes
MY LIST
Dennett explored the major themes of his forthcoming book, 'From Bacteria to Bach and Back', including how our minds came into existence, how our brains work, and how ideas are culturally transmitted. He exploded many of the notions we take for granted about how we think – such as the idea of the individual – offering instead a bold new explanation of human consciousness which views it largely as a product of cultural evolution built up over millennia.<br>Sharing the stage with Dennett were key figures from the next generation of scientists, AI experts, philosophers and artists, with whom he will engage on what it means to be human.
Daniel Dennett: On if Brains are Computers, Who Designs the Software?
76 minutes
MY LIST
There is widespread agreement among researchers in cognitive science that a human brain is some kind of computer, but not much like the laptop. If we look at perceptual experience, and education in particular, as a process of redesigning our cerebral computers, how does the software get designed, and what are the limits of this design process? Daniel C Dennett finds out.
Daniel Dennett: On the intersection of evolution and religion at the National Convention
60 minutes
MY LIST
Dennett’s work exists at the intersection of a number of fields. Drawing on his knowledge of evolutionary biology, religion, philosophy and more, he makes interesting connections between phenomena and pulls it all together to tell a compelling story. Always worth a watch.
Daniel Dennett: On Information, Evolution, and Intelligent Design
61 minutes
MY LIST
The concept of information is fundamental to all areas of science, and ubiquitous in daily life in the Internet Age. However, it is still not well understood despite being recognised for more than 40 years. In this talk, Daniel Dennett explores steps towards a unified theory of information, through common threads in evolution, learning, and engineering
Daniel Dennett: On Bacteria to Bach and Back: The Evolution of Minds at Google
76 minutes
MY LIST
How did we come to have minds?<br>For centuries, this question has intrigued psychologists, physicists, poets, and philosophers, who have wondered how the human mind developed its unrivaled ability to create, imagine, and explain. Disciples of Darwin have long aspired to explain how consciousness, language, and culture could have appeared through natural selection, blazing promising trails that tend, however, to end in confusion and controversy. Even though our understanding of the inner workings of proteins, neurons, and DNA is deeper than ever before, the matter of how our minds came to be has largely remained a mystery.<br>That is now changing, says Daniel C. Dennett. In From Bacteria to Bach and Back, his most comprehensive exploration of evolutionary thinking yet, he builds on ideas from computer science and biology to show how a comprehending mind could in fact have arisen from a mindless process of natural selection. Part philosophical whodunit, part bold scientific conjecture, this landmark work enlarges themes that have sustained Dennett’s legendary career at the forefront of philosophical thought.