Sign In
Aaron Levie Alain de Botton Alan Watts Alexis Ohanian Andreas Antonopoulos Andrew DeSantis Andrew Lo Arthur De Vany Aubrey de Grey Balaji Srinivasan Ben Bratton Bill Bryson Bryan Caplan Carl Jung Chamath Palihapitiya Chris Arnade Chris Sacca Daniel Dennett Daniel Kahneman David Linden David Sacks Derek Parfit Derek Sivers Douglas Hofstadter E.O. Wilson Elon Musk Eric Weinstein Ezra Klein Gad Saad George Gilder George Lakoff Ido Portal J.D. Vance James Altucher James Gleick Jason Silva Jeff Bezos Jim Simons Jocko Willink John Hagelin John Nash Jordan Peterson Josh Waitzkin Julia Galef Kelly Starrett Kevin Kelly Kevin Rose Kim Scott Kumar Thangudu Leonard Shlain Malcolm Gladwell Marc Andreessen Maria Konnikova Maria Popova Matt Ridley Michael Hiltzik Michael Sandel Naval Ravikant Neil Strauss Neil Turok Nick Bostrom Nick Szabo Noah Kagan Noam Chomsky Oliver Sacks P.D. Mangan Paul Bloom Paul Graham Peter Attia Peter Diamandis Peter Thiel Reid Hoffman Rhonda Patrick Richard Feynman Richard Rorty Robert Caro Robert Cialdini Robert Greene Robert Kurzban Robert Langer Robert McNamara Robert Putnam Robert Sapolsky Rory Sutherland Ryan Holiday Sam Altman Sam Harris Scott Adams Scott Belsky Scott Galloway Seth Godin Shawn Baker Shinzen Young Siddhartha Mukherjee Simon Sinek Slavoj Zizek Stephen Wolfram Steve Jobs Steven Pinker Stewart Butterfield Ted Nelson Tiago Forte Tim Ferriss Tim Urban Timothy Gowers Timothy Pychyl Tyler Cowen Vaclav Smil Valter Longo Venkatesh Rao Vinay Gupta Vincent Dignan Will MacAskill Wim Hof Yanis Varoufakis Yuval Harari
Jordan Peterson
Jordan Bernt Peterson (born June 12, 1962) is a Canadian clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at the University of Toronto. His main areas of study are the psychology of religious and ideological belief, and the assessment and improvement of personality and performance. He authored Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief in 1999.
Jordan Peterson: On SJW and Psychology at Joe Rogan Experience #877
170 minutes
MY LIST
Jordan Peterson's first chat with Joe Rogan. A tour de force, as always with JP.<br>0:00:00 - Castro, Trudeau talk.<br>0:01:40 - Gender Pronoun discussion.<br>0:09:40 - How did we get to this point where we're repeating these patterns (deadly) like Marxism from the past?? <br>0:14:15 - Why these people tend lean to this thinking (equality of outcome obsession).<br>0:19:00 - Hypocrisy and Inconsistency of the Left.<br>0:20:00 - Wage Gap BTFO<br>0:26:45 - One bit answers to everything (from the Left).<br>0:30:00 - Joe is dumbfounded by arguments from the Left about gender.<br>0:34:15 - People who have issues w/ Pronouns are fraction of fraction of Trans-people. (Incoherent claims).<br>0:35:00 - Story of Wellesley student that became man (for identity) then was denounced by own community. CHAOS.<br>0:36:40 - Getting caught in the infinite rainbow. Once everyone is marginalized, nobody is left.<br>0:38:40 - Can't have society unless everyone at least sacrifices a little bit of your individuality.<br>0:42:50 - SJWs enforcing their thinking aggressively (explained).<br>0:47:55 - Racial biases in people. Mandatory, unconscious racism training and re-education programs.<br>0:53:50 - How did we get here (asks Joe)?? (Jordan explains).<br>0:57:00 - Ideologies (seemingly innocuous) can take you down dangerous roads. (Those I disagree with are enemies).<br>0:59:00 - How millions perished in Soviet Russia. Posters saying: "Don't forget, it's wrong to eat your children"<br>1:01:40 - Why do these patterns repeat themselves (asks Joe)? "We like things simple". (who's a friend or enemy).<br>1:02:25 - Yale cupcake student BTFO....plus Halloween talk.<br>1:06:45 - Maps of Meaning class...plus how to make people less afraid.<br>1:09:30 - When did all this start (asks Joe)?? <br>1:10:50 - What exactly is going on with women's studies which is fostering radical revolution (asks Joe)??<br>1:14:10 - SJWs mentality (resentment for the burden of being).<br>1:17:30 - The University=ideological factories. Admins conspire to steal future earnings of students. Indentured Servitude<br>1:20:30 - Ask a professor if they're a Marxist. Gulag Archipelago=required reading.<br>1:22:20 - Warren Farrell questions income disparity.<br>1:24:30 - Jordan accused of hate speech.<br>1:28:25 - Jordan's YouTube presence.<br>1:31:55 - Radical Left eating its own.<br>1:34:45 - Are you cynical about the future (asks Joe)??<br>1:37:40 - Long discussion about online learning and teaching.<br>1:48:50 - Jordan talks about his consulting experiences and his self-authoring suite.<br>2:02:00 - Jordan talks about reconciling being a scientist and deeply religious at the same time. (Christ=meta-hero).<br>2:09:25 - Jordan talks about comic book archetypes and universe.<br>2:16:10 - Joe asks why Cross-fit or Yoga is used as substitute for Religion (seeking fellowship, discipline, etc).<br>2:21:00 - Tensions between dogmatic element and spiritual element.<br>2:26:30 - Ideology is a parasite on religious substructures (J.K. Rowling understood).<br>2:29:30 - Capitalism isn't the problem, it's Evil. Well, yes, but...(Hurricane Katrina). God is what transcends your knowledge.<br>2:32:30 - Is the problem the term 'God'?<br>2:34:15 - Do these stories exists because there is a need for this order? (Yes, how it is we must live. Order, to avoid hell).<br>2:36:00 - Apocalypse coming? No, it's always here.<br>2:38:55 - Is frustrating not getting support for Jordan's actions?<br>2:40:10 - Intelligent != healthy or moral. Story of low I.Q. lady.<br>2:43:25 - Trying putting yourself in Auschwitz camp guard role. If opportunity presented itself, I'm not doing it.<br>2:44:40 - Truth no matter what. My language. Not saying your words or being compelled to. Legal talk.<br>2:47:50 - Closing Questions to Jordan. (SORT YOURSELF OUT, MARSHALL YOUR ARGUMENTS).
Jordan Peterson: Context and Background
151 minutes
MY LIST
Peterson discusses the context within which the theory he is delineating through this course emerge: that of the cold war. What is belief? Why is it so important to people? Why will they fight to protect it? He proposes that belief unites a culture's expectations and desires with the actions of its people, and that the match between those two allows for cooperative action and maintains emotional stability. He suggests, further, that culture has a deep narrative structure, presenting the world as a forum for action, with characters representing the individual, the known, and the unknown -- or the individual, culture and nature -- or the individual, order and chaos.
Jordan Peterson: Introduction to the Idea of God
158 minutes
MY LIST
Lecture I in my Psychological Significance of the Biblical Stories series from May 16th at Isabel Bader Theatre in Toronto. In this lecture, I describe what I consider to be the idea of God, which is at least partly the notion of sovereignty and power, divorced from any concrete sovereign or particular, individual person of power. I also suggest that God, as Father, is something akin to the spirit or pattern inherent in the human hierarchy of authority, which is based in turn on the dominance hierarchies characterizing animals. Q & A Starts: 1:57:25
Jordan Peterson: On His Battle with SJW at Joe Rogan Experience #958
177 minutes
MY LIST
Support Dr. Peterson's work at www.patreon.com/jordanbpeterson<br><br>0:30 - denied a grant to research political correctness?<br>3:30 - hammer & sickle vs nazi symbol<br>8:00 - allies and social points<br>13:15 - the gender unicorn <br>17:20 - those who claim to be legitimate representatives of a community vs heterogeneous views within<br>23:00 - post-modern neo Marxist using trans issues as a lever to push political nonsense<br>27:45 - Zer <br>30:45 - post-modernists opposed to having dialogues<br>41:00 - we are in a war of ideas<br>46:45 - teach people evil to help them understand themselves<br>48:00 - university's monitoring, intervention, and threat of student's private utterances on social media<br>50:20 - mansplaining<br>53:00 - best personality predictor of political correctness is the agreeableness trait<br>54:00 - causes for violence by the left<br>57:00 - the dominance hierarchy, Hitler<br>1:10:00 - good vs evil<br>1:13:30 - fight or flight or freeze<br>1:18:00 - bargaining with the future<br>1:23:30 - men were competing for influence, corruption leadership to attract women; hero<br>1:28:30 - men competing as allies to beat the hierarchy<br>1:31:00 - kek the frog; period of chaos<br>1:35:00 - tell the truth to deal with chaos in the underworld<br>1:41:30 - clean up your room before you try and change the outside<br>1:48:00 - morality comes when you are a monster and you can control it<br>1:58:00 - order, corruption, chaos<br>2:04:30 - 90% of my viewers and men<br>2:09:00 - accept your mortality<br>2:14:00 - future authoring and finding a purpose<br>2:17:00 - you cant trust yourself if you lie<br>2:28:00 - the biggest employment category (driver) is disappearing; the future is uncertain<br>2:31:30 - trump - unstructured problem with truth vs Hillary - structured problem with untruth<br>2:33:00 - you are in the top 1% too<br>2:37:00 - creative people is a double-edged blessing; you stand out - you die<br>2:41:30 - Canada suppresses excellence while USA celebrates it<br>2:43:20 - hierarchies are no always based on power but on competence<br>2:47:30 - why the university backed off from Peterson
Jordan Peterson: On The Architecture of Belief with Stefan Molyneux
90 minutes
MY LIST
What is the reason behind the drift of western culture into empty nihilistic materialistic hedonism? Dr. Jordan Peterson joins Stefan Molyneux to discuss the complicated nature of cultural division, the reduction of personal responsibility, the danger of not "having meaning" in your life, the nature of ideology, developing a sense of efficacy in the world, suffering as an intrinsic component to human nature, the argument for free will and much more!
Jordan Peterson: Story and Metastory (Part 1)
142 minutes
MY LIST
Peterson makes the case that we each inhabit a story, describing where we are, where we are going, and the actions we must undertake to get from the former to the latter. These inhabited stories are predicated on an underlying value system (as we must want to be where we are going more than we value where we are). In addition, they are frames of reference, allowing us to perceive (things that move us along; things that get in our way), make most of the world irrelevant (things that have no bearing on our current frame), and determine emotional significance (positive: things that move us along; negative: things that get in our way)
Jordan Peterson: Story and Metastory (Part 2)
147 minutes
MY LIST
Peterson discusses uncertainty, or anomaly. We frame the world -- or the world reveals itself to us -- as a story, with a starting point, a destination, and the behavioral means to move from one to the other. The destination is valued more highly than the starting point, and constitutes the point of the story -- the aim of the individual. Reality manifests itself within that story as what is relevant for forward movement, what gets in the way, and what is irrelevant and can be safely ignored. The largest category, by far, is the latter. Unfortunately, sometimes what has been happily classified as irrelevant rears up and gets in the way. That's a manifestation of chaos. Chaos can undermine the story, or break the frame. The degree of undermining or breakage is proportional to the time and space over which the story in question extends its operations.
Jordan Peterson: Marionettes and Individuals (Part 3)
56 minutes
MY LIST
He concludes the analysis of the Disney film Pinocchio, which is conducted to illustrate how archetypal/mythological themes permeate popular culture.
Jordan Peterson: Images of Story & MetaStory
131 minutes
MY LIST
Peterson discusses how the basic or archetypal categories we use to frame the world are represented in image, where they existed long before their nature could be articulated. These categories include the individual (hero/adversary), culture (wise king/tyrant), and nature (destruction/creation). The heroic individual (the knower) is typically masculine, as is culture (the known), while the unknown is feminine. These categories can be conceptualized, as well, as explorer, explored territory, and unexplored territory. The most abstract category is the dragon of chaos, the monster who guards what is most valuable. It is from this most primordial of categories that the other three emerge. Our existence as prey and predator is reflected in the ambivalent representation of the absolute unknown.
Jordan Peterson: Patterns of Symbolic Representation
136 minutes
MY LIST
Peterson discusses the manner in which the fundamental symbolic archetypes (particularly those dealing with the Wise King and Tyrant) are hijacked for the purposes of propaganda. Ideologies are parasites. Their hosts are archetypes. Knowledge of the underlying archetypes can produce immunity against ideological possession.
Jordan Peterson: Neuropsychology of Symbolic Representation
141 minutes
MY LIST
Peterson discusses the relationship between the basic categories of imagistic/symbolic representation and brain function, noting that the very hemispheres of the brain are adapted, right/left to the environmental or experiential permanence of chaos/order or unexplored/explored territory, with consciousness serving the Logos role of communicative explorer (a function related in one of its deepest manifestations to the function of the hypothalamically grounded dopaminergic systems).
Jordan Peterson: Marionettes & Individuals (Part 1)
143 minutes
MY LIST
He begins using a particular piece of dramatic art -- the Disney film Pinocchio -- to provide a specific example of the manner in which great mythological or archetypal themes inform and permeate narrative.
Jordan Peterson: The Flood and the Tower
152 minutes
MY LIST
Peterson continues the discussion of the archaic stories at the beginning of Genesis, including Cain and Abel, and the flood story of Noah (the return of chaos), and the story of the Tower of Babel (which I am reading as a very old warning about the danger of erecting something akin to a totalitarian/utopian secular state -- so that is pathological order).
Jordan Peterson: Genesis and the Buddha
138 minutes
MY LIST
Peterson discusses the creation stories in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, and describe the parallels with the stories of the development of the Buddha from childhood to early adulthood, using the archetypal schema developed previous in the course.
Jordan Peterson: Introduction
54 minutes
MY LIST
Peterson defines personality from multiple angles, historical, constructivist, psychoanalytic, behavioral and neuropsychological. Personality is a way of looking at the world, and a characteristic mode of behaving. It's both stable and adaptively dynamic.
Jordan Peterson: The Divinity of the Individual
145 minutes
MY LIST
In this, the final Maps of Meaning lecture for 2017, Peterson reviews the year and its offerings: What is a belief system? Why are people so inclined to engage in conflict to protect their belief systems? It's partly because our belief systems are not only systems of belief, but structures that serve to render everyone who participates in that belief and its dramatization and acting out in the world predictable, trustworthy and cooperative (even when competing). <br> Is there a hierarchy of rank or value among belief systems, or are they merely arbitrary? <br> What is the relationship between descriptions of the objective world and moral guidelines? How do you determine how to conduct yourself in the world? What should you do (and is that question even genuine -- or answerable?) <br> What inbuilt structures do you bring into the world, as a consequence of biological evolution, that help you orient yourself in life, in the face of its overwhelming complexity? What is the relationship between the games that children learn to play when becoming socialized and the cultural structures that guide us in broader society? How is all this related to the underlying symbolic structures (religious structures) that sit at the base of our societies and belief structures?
Jordan Peterson: Marionettes and Individuals (Part 2)
146 minutes
MY LIST
He continues with the analysis of the Disney film Pinocchio to illustrate the manner in which great mythological or archetypal themes inform and permeate both the creation and the understanding of narratives.
Jordan Peterson: Heroic and Shamanic Initiations
157 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, 04 and 05 combined, Peterson discusses the relationship between the initiatory structure characteristic of shamanism and the process of radical personality transformation, self- or therapy-induced. The basic structure is order/paradise, chaos/the fall, re-establishment of order/paradise. Since all paradises fall, however, the true paradise is identification with the process of transformation itself.
Jordan Peterson: Historical & Mythological Context
138 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, 02 and 03 combined, Peterson provides some historical context for the understanding of personality, suggesting that the clinical theories, concerned with the transformation and improvement of personality and character, are embedded within a classic narrative/mythological structure.
Jordan Peterson: Jean Piaget & Constructivism
105 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, Peterson talks about the great developmental psychologist Jean Piaget, who was interested, above all, in the way that knowledge is generated and transforms. His analysis of the development of morality in children, which relates early play to social cooperation and competition, is particularly profound.
Jordan Peterson: Carl Jung and the Lion King (Part 1)
54 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, I use Disney's Lion King to further illustrate the basic principles of the personality and clinical theories of Dr. Carl Gustav Jung, student of Nietzsche and Freud, originator of analytical psychology, and great interpreter of mythology and archetype.
Jordan Peterson: Freud and the Dynamic Unconscious
131 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, 9th in the 2017 series, Peterson discusses some of the essential of Sigmund Freud's theories, concentrating on his conceptualizations of the dynamic (living) unconscious.
Jordan Peterson: Carl Jung and the Lion King (Part 2)
104 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, Peterson finishes the analysis of Disney's Lion King, which provides a dramatic representation of many of the archetypes identified and analyzed by Dr. Carl Gustav Jung, student of Nietzsche and Freud, and originator of analytical psychology.
Jordan Peterson: Existentialism via Solzhenitsyn and the Gulag
101 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, I explore the dreadful socio-political consequences of the individual inauthentic life: the degeneration of society into nihilism or totalitarianism, often of the most murderous sort, employing as an example the work/death camps of the Soviet Union. Buy The Gulag Archipelago by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. It is arguably the most important book of the twentieth century.
Jordan Peterson: Introduction to Traits/Psychometrics/The Big 5
49 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, Peterson begins discussing the development of modern trait theory. Psychologists, expert in measurement and statistics, discovered extraversion, neuroticism, agreeableness, conscientiousness and openness to experience, and began the process of delineating their social significance and biological underpinnings..
Jordan Peterson: Existentialism: Nietzsche Dostoevsky & Kierkegaard
94 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, 11th in the 2017 series, Peterson discusses the giants of existentialism, a philosophically-grounded psychological position positing (1) that psychopathology or mental illness/distress is built into Being itself and (2) that the adoption of responsibility through action is the appropriate response.
Jordan Peterson: Humanism & Phenomenology: Carl Rogers
50 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, 10th in the 2017 series, Peterson begins to talk about Dr. Carl Rogers, a humanist psychotherapist in the phenomenological tradition, and an expert on listening and embodied wisdom. Dr. Rogers offers very profound and practical lessons on the value of truthful relationships.
Jordan Peterson: Phenomenology: Heidegger, Binswanger, Boss
46 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, 12th in the 2017 series, Peterson discusses the Heidegger's phenomenological philosophy of Being, interpreted through the eyes of the psychotherapists Ludwig Binswanger and Medard Boss. The phenomenologists were attempting to to reduce the painful separation between object and subject that has as one of its consequence the elimination of meaning from existence.
Jordan Peterson: Biology/Traits: The Limbic System
78 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, I begin my discussion of the relationship between brain function, at a deep, subcortical level, and the existence of the five traits identified by psychometric researchers. This is a repost from a 2014 lecture, but the slides are edited in.
Jordan Peterson: Biology/Traits: Incentive Reward/Neuroticism
73 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, Peterson continues the discussion of the relationship between subcortical brain processes and the big five personality traits identified by psychometric researchers, focusing on the relationship between positive/negative emotion and extraversion/neuroticism.
Jordan Peterson: Biology and Traits: Agreeableness
49 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, Peterson talks about the Big Five trait agreeableness, which is the dimension of the care system, in Jaak Panksepp's terminology. It can be construed as cooperation vs competition, or compliance vs non-compliance, or tender-mindedness vs tough-mindedness. It is also an important determinant of political belief, being the trait most associated with the body of ideas that has come to be known as politically correct.
Jordan Peterson: Biology & Traits: Openness/Intelligence/Creativity I
105 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, Peterson talks about Big Five trait openness to experience, which is the dimension composed of an amalgam of creativity and intelligence. I also discuss IQ: how it is measured, what it means, how powerfully it predicts long-term life success, as well as the highly skewed Pareto distribution of creative production.
Jordan Peterson: Biology & Traits: Openness/Intelligence/Creativity II
48 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, Peterson completes the discussion of Big Five trait openness to experience, which is the dimension composed of an amalgam of creativity and intelligence. He also discusses IQ: how it is measured, what it means, how powerfully it predicts long-term life success, as well as the highly skewed Pareto distribution of creative production.
Jordan Peterson: Conclusion: Psychology and Belief
68 minutes
MY LIST
Peterson brings the 2017 Introduction to Personality and its Transformations to its close, talking about the psychology of belief, describing the reality and potential of the individual. Human beings are information foragers, evolved to live on the border between explored and unexplored territory, order and chaos and, symbolically, ying and yang. That's where information flow is maximized, and the meaning that helps buttress us against tragedy is to be found.
Jordan Peterson: Biology & Traits: Performance Prediction
88 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, I talk about the thorny problem of predicting performance: academic, industrial, creative and entrepreneurial); about the practical utility of such prediction, in the business and other environments; about the economic value of accurate prediction (in hiring, placement and promotion) -- which is incredibly high. <br> Intelligence (psychometrically measured IQ) is the best predictor of performance in complex, ever changing environments. Conscientiousness is the (next) best predictor, particularly in the military, in school and in conservative businesses. Agreeable people make better caretakers; disagreeable people, better disciplinarians and negotiators (within reasonable bounds). Open people are artistic, creative and entrepreneurial. Extraverts are good socially. Introverts work well in isolation. People low in neuroticism have higher levels of tolerance for stress (but may be less sensitive to real signs of danger). <br> Match the career you pursue to your temperament, rather than trying to adjust the latter. Although some adjustment is possible, there are powerful biological determinants of the five personality dimensions and IQ (particularly in environments where differences are allowed to flourish).
Jordan Peterson: Biology & Traits: Orderliness/Disgust/Conscientiousness
94 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, Peterson provides details about trait conscientiousness, the best predictor of life success after intelligence (particularly among managers, administrators and students). Sounds good? But conscientiousness is partly composed of aspect orderliness, along with industriousness, and orderliness is associated both with disgust and with authoritarianism (particularly among those low in openness to experience). Hitler and the Jews? The Holocaust? Orderliness and disgust sensitivity gone mad.
Jordan Peterson: Genesis 1: Chaos & Order
152 minutes
MY LIST
Lecture II in my Psychological Significance of the Biblical Stories from May 23 at Isabel Bader Theatre, Toronto. In this lecture, I present Genesis 1, which presents the idea that a pre-existent cognitive structure (God the Father) uses the Logos, the Christian Word, the second Person of the Trinity, to generate habitable order out of precosmogonic chaos at the beginning of time. It is in that Image that Man and Woman are created -- indicating, perhaps, that it is (1) through speech that we participate in the creation of the cosmos of experience and (2) that what true speech creates is good. It is a predicate of Western culture that each individual partakes in some manner in the divine. This is the true significance of consciousness, which has a world-creating aspect. Q & A Starts: 1:59:00
Jordan Peterson: God and the Hierarchy of Authority
146 minutes
MY LIST
Although I thought I might get to Genesis II in this third lecture, and begin talking about Adam & Eve, it didn't turn out that way. There was more to be said about the idea of God as creator (with the Word as the process underlying the act of creation). I didn't mind, because it is very important to get God and the Creation of the Universe right before moving on. In this lecture, I tried to outline something like this: for anything to be, there has to be a substrate (call it a potential) from which it emerges, a structure that provides the possibility of imposing order on that substrate, and the act of ordering, itself. So the first is something like the precosmogonic chaos (implicitly feminine); the second, God the Father; the third, what the Christian West has portrayed as the Son (the Word of Truth).
Jordan Peterson: Walking with God: Noah and the Flood
152 minutes
MY LIST
Life at the individual and the societal level is punctuated by crisis and catastrophe. This stark truth finds its narrative representation in the widely-distributed universal motif of the flood. Mircea Eliade, the great Romanian historian of religion, noted that flood stories identify two reasons for the destruction: (1) the tendency of complex things to fall apart of their own accord; (2) the proclivity of human beings to speed up that process by sinning, or missing the mark (by engaging in self-evident corruption, or by failing to attend to what cries out for attention). The Genesis story clearly states that Noah and his family are to be spared from impending disaster because Noah “walks with God,” as Adam did before the Fall. In this lecture, the 7th in the series, I intermingle the story of Noah and his survival with elements of the Sermon on the Mount, making the effort to explain to a modern audience why careful moral attitude and behavior comprises the best defence against the righteous anger of God.
Jordan Peterson: Cain and Abel: The Hostile Brothers
151 minutes
MY LIST
Bible Series V: Cain and Abel: The Hostile Brothers. The account of Cain and Abel is remarkable for its unique combination of brevity and depth. In a few short sentences, it outlines two diametrically opposed modes of being -- both responses to the emergence of self-consciousness and the knowledge of good and evil detailed in story of Adam and Eve. <br>Cain's mode of being -- resentful, arrogant and murderous -- arises because his sacrifices are rejected by God. This means that his attempts to give up something valuable in the present to ensure prosperity in the future are insufficient. He fails, in consequence, to thrive, as he believes he should, and becomes bitter, resentful and murderous. <br>Abel's mode of being is characterized, by contrast, by proper sacrifice -- by the establishment of balance between present action and future benefit. This ensures his personal and social success, accruing over time. Unfortunately, it also makes him the target of Cain's malevolence. <br>This great short story is relevant personally, on the level of the family, and politically, all with equal force, all simultaneously.
Jordan Peterson: The Psychology of the Flood
155 minutes
MY LIST
The story of Noah and the Ark is next in the Genesis sequence. This is a more elaborated tale than the initial creation account, or the story of Adam and Eve or Cain and Abel. However, it cannot be understood in its true depth without some investigation into what the motif of the flood means, psychologically, and an analysis of how that motif is informed by the order/chaos dichotomy, as well as by the idea of an involuntary voyage to the underworld or confrontation with the dragon. In consequence, this lecture concentrates almost exclusively on Psychology: How is an encounter with the unknown to be understood, conceptually? How and why is that represented with themes such as the underworld voyage, the dragon fight, or the flood?
Jordan Peterson: Abrahamic Stories, with Matthieu & Jonathan Pageau
85 minutes
MY LIST
I had this 90 minute discussion with Jonathan Pageau, carver of Orthodox icons and YouTube broadcaster, as well as his brother Matthieu, who recently finished a draft of a book on the bible. I did so as part of the background research I was doing for the 8th lecture in my series The Psychological Significance of the Biblical Stories. We talked about the nature of the narrative landscape of the Bible, focusing on the Abrahamic stories, which constitute the subject material for that 8th and other forthcoming lectures.
Jordan Peterson: The Phenomenology of the Divine
160 minutes
MY LIST
In the next series of stories, the Biblical patriarch Abram (later: Abraham) enters into a covenant with God. The history of Israel proper begins with these stories. Abram heeds the call to adventure, journeys courageously away from his country and family into the foreign and unknown, encounters the disasters of nature and the tyranny of mankind and maintains his relationship with the God who has sent him forth. He becomes in this manner a light in the world, and a father of nations. How is this all to be understood? I am attempting in this lecture to determine precisely that. How are we, as modern people, to make sense of the idea of the God who reveals himself to a personality? How can we relate the details of the Abramic stories to our own lives, in the current world? In what frame of reference can these stories be seen to make sense, and to reveal their meaning?
Jordan Peterson: The Call to Abraham
155 minutes
MY LIST
In this lecture, I tell the story of Abraham, who heeds the call of God to leave what was familiar behind and to journey into unknown lands. The man portrayed in the Bible as the father of nations moves forward into the world. He encounters the worst of nature (famine), society (the tyranny of Egypt) and the envy of the powerful, who desire his wife. There is nothing easy about Abraham's life. Instead, he is portrayed both as a real man, with serious problems, and a hero, who overcomes tremendous obstacles to establish himself in the world. His covenant with God is an Ark. His decision to aim at the highest good he can conceptualize places an aura of magic around the events of his life, despite their harshness. He's a model for life in the world as it is, not as we wish it would be.
Jordan Peterson: Abraham: Father of Nations
148 minutes
MY LIST
The Abrahamic adventures continue with this, the tenth lecture in my 12-part initial Biblical lecture series. Abraham's life is presented as a series of encapsulated narratives, punctuated by sacrifice, and the rekindling of his covenant with God. This seems to reflect the pattern of human life: the journey towards a goal, or destination, and the completion of a stage or epoch of life, followed by the necessity of revaluation and reconsideration of identity, prior to the next step forward. Abraham, for his part, makes the sacrifices necessary to continue to walk with God, or before God (as the terminology in this section has it). It is this decision that allows him to transcend the vicissitudes of life, and to take his role as the father of nations.
Jordan Peterson: Sodom and Gomorrah
2 minutes
MY LIST
Often interpreted as an injunction against homosexuality (particularly by those simultaneously claiming identity as Christians and opposed to that orientation), the stories of the angels who visit Abraham, bless him, and then rain destruction on Sodom and Gomorrah are more truly a warning against mistreatment of the stranger and impulsive, dysregulated, sybaritic conduct. Abraham opens his heart and hearth to the stranger. The denizens of Lot’s soon-to-be lost cities threaten them with violent rape. God exacts a terrible retribution. The warning is clear.
Jordan Peterson: Adam and Eve: Self-Consciousness, Evil, and Death
152 minutes
MY LIST
I turned my attention in this lecture to the older of the two creation accounts in Genesis: the story of Adam and Eve. In its few short paragraphs, it covers: <br>1. the emergence of human self-consciousness; <br>2. mankind's attendant realization of vulnerability, mortality, and death; <br>3. the origin of the capacity for willful evil, as the ability to exploit that newly-realized vulnerability; <br>4. the emergence of shame as a consequence of that realization; <br>5. the shrinking from divine destiny that occurred when shame emerged; and <br>6. the beginning of true history, with the self-conscious toil that life in history entails. <br>The only story that can perhaps match it in terms of impact per sentence is that of Cain and Abel, which we discuss in the next lecture: number five in this twelve part series.
Jordan Peterson: The Great Sacrifice: Abraham and Isaac
153 minutes
MY LIST
In this, the final lecture of the Summer 2017 12-part series The Psychological Significance of the Biblical Stories, we encounter, first, Hagar's banishment to the desert with Ishmael and then the demand made by God to Abraham for the sacrifice of Isaac.To sacrifice now is to gain later: perhaps the greatest of human discoveries. What, then, should best be sacrificed? And what might be the greatest gain? There are few eternal questions more profound and difficult.In this lecture, I read an excerpt from Chapter 7 of my new book, 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos, now available for pre-order at Amazon.ca (http://amzn.to/2wkb7MY) and Amazon.com (http://amzn.to/2x1hfXF).